does the string actually matter?


#1

I always here people saying well I use this brand string and its 50 percent this or that…does it actually matter? and if so what strings do you prefer?


#2

yes it does. they are different thickness, roughness, some last longer, etc. I don’t really know too much detail about it. I prefer 100% polyester


#3

it does matter to an extent. you can do any tricks with any string technically. it’s preference.
Generally though, for all styles, 50/50 (50% cotton, 50% polyester), polyester, nylon, or a poly nylon blend is used. different brands will play differently. some will be heavier, making it better for whip and slack tricks, and some will be lighter, which usually makes the tension better I think.

The only string I would never recommend using is cotton. it’s prone to breaking, and is rough on the hands. for looping I’d go with 50/50 or poly, and for any other style I’d go with poly or nylon.


#4

what brand of string makes a heavier string…i really like whips and slacks:)


(Jeremy Mryoyothrower McKay) #5

One of the biggest difference i’ve noticed between string types aside from thickness is tension. Some hand made string (such as G-String) holds tension a lot longer and requires less to get it back to neutral when it goes out. With generic poly string I find I’m fixing my tension every few throws.


#6

Yes.


#7

I’d recommend graou. it’s a bit more expensive a piece ($1.50 a string) but it’s supposed to be some amazing string. Lasts 10x longer than your run of the mill poly, great for slacks/whips, and holds tension nicely.
I haven’t actually used it though, but I’ve heard a lot of people say this.

Some string I’ve personally used though that I’d suggest checking out, which is cheaper than graou ($5 for a 10 pack I think) is g string. it’s great stuff.

Also heard good things about kitty string, ham string, and gator floss (which isn’t currently being made I don’t think).
personally though, I’m not that big a fan of snacktime. they’re a bit too short for my taste from what I’ve seen. Another option you could try is spinning some of your own. :slight_smile:
my first string I made turned out pretty good actually.


#8

I can’t say if string really matters. I can say that in my case, i’ve tried 100% cotton and 50/50 slick6, and I like the Slick6 better. The bad thing is I bought the cotton in bulk but I got 2 kids who are throwing too(Ok, learning, still counts), so there’s plenty for them. I can either DO or NOT DO the same trick with either type of string. I’m kinda consistent that way!

On my next order from YYE, I’m ordering 100% poly and see how I like that. Chances are I will, so might as well stock up on it.(there’s going to be plenty of other stuff in that box as well!) It’s so inexpensive in my opinion it’s not really a big deal.

The number of brands just adds to the confusion, as well as the different blends and types within the varieties. Still, it may be beneficial to buy some variety packs with lots of different stuff so you can try before really committing, or else small quantities of different stuff(say 5 or 10 counts). Then once you find what you like, then stick with it.

Remember, strings, like yoyos, there’s no single “right”. There’s only what’s right for you and that’s all that matters. Go to the various web sites and gather as much information as possible. See what they have to say about their product and then evaluate that with how you play or your interests. For now, I’m pleased with the offerings that YYE currently has. But, as my skills improve, I’m willing to try other stuff.


#9

yes. string does matter for whips slacks lacerations ect.
right now I use 100 poly but I am soon going to try kelvar string


#10

I use Chaos string religiously. Love the poly/nylon combo. I also have Kevlar string but don’t like the feel of it for slacks


#11

i use pyshco string’s. its my string company and their awesome i will start selling them soon. check out the website:http://psychoyoyostrings.webs.com/


#12

Different styles of play can call for different types of string. String can be defined by the following qualities:

Material

Tension

Thickness

Mallability

Strength

Different types of strings can affect play very much. For example: a type of string can be better for a style of slack and laceration than another. 100% poly is the most balanced string out of all the high quality kinds. Read reviews of strings online to find the one that fits your style of play. Some people might think it doesn’t affect much, but the slightest detail can determine between frustration and perfection. Hope you understand the gibberish.


#13

In my opinion, you’re better off learning how to make your own string and experimenting with materials and thickness. That way you can get exactly what you want whenever you want.


#14

I don’t completely agree with that statement of learning to make your own string.

In the beginning, it’s best to just purchase string. For the experienced, that’s an option.

If I took that mindset to my chosen profession of live sound audio, where do I start? Refining copper to my specs? Winding it? Jacket, casing, filler material? Twists per foot? Conductors and gauge? Metal material for cable ends? Type of plastic? Material for conductors? Connectivity method inside(hole vs cup vs press vs punch vs. screw down vs. pressure fit vs spring load) Boot material, boot securing, does the boot seal or not? Anodized or bare, metal for shell, ferric or not. Do I ad an RF filter or not? Shield braid or foil or coiled? And if coiled, one direction or bi-directional? Then the performance for cable handling that the shield can impact. (Foil is best, but is very stiff, while braid is good but is very flexible and is for better winding. Coil just plain sucks, but foil often goes with some coil to facilitate connection to the connector pin 1). Strain relief system? Maintainable or disposable? That’s a lot just for a mic cable!

But, taking it back to yoyos, I think players should understand what goes INTO making a string. This knowledge should help players properly understand why string tension is so important. If not string, then yarn, twine, thread or even rope, as many of the principles are the same. But since yoyo string is wound back upon itself, it’s a bit different. The more knowledge one has, it should be better for them. As a minimum, they learn the value of string tension. But they should also become informed in general terms the performance feature of each string.

Even as a beginner, I’m starting to see how string tension can make a difference. My problem is due to my newness, after I get the string tension out, for some reason, my next throw almost always ends in a disaster due to some sort of mechanical error on my part and NOT because of some issue with the string.

I’m also noticing the condition of the string makes a big difference as well. However, I’m not going to change the string every day at this point. At the rate I’m going through string, it’s 1-2 a week at best. I’d like to be able to practice more, but I’m lucky to get 15 minutes a day.


#15

Graou string lasts much longer than 10x your usual poly, I got some on some of my throws and they’re there for weeks, I only change them when they’re too dirty, but they still play good.

that said, I like finding the best string for each throw, DON’T use a graou on a Steamroller with stock response pads, this is how I hurt my tooth ^^

graou strings are fairly heavy too
chaos 422 are also nice, very nice
Kitty and kitty slims are my basic poly of choice
with these 3 you’re all set for any yoyo


#16

Really, making string isn’t very complicated. There isn’t much knowledge you need to make some.


#17

well what all do you need and where do you buy the string parts? lol


#18

where do you boy graou strings? or any of the other highly liked brands…


#19

try mp graou on this board, but I’m pretty sure some stores do sell these, obviously I can’t tell you which ones on here


#20

I’m not entirely sure, but I think that posting links to places that only sell string is acceptable.

@OP
Try googling different string brands. that’s how I found 'em.
And as far as making your own string, it’s really easy. you need a drill or rotary tool (technically you could do it be hand, but that would probably take like an hour per string) some sewing thread (polyester works nicely. most thread you find in stores is polyester), some kind of a hook you can put in your drill/dremel (a bent coat hanger works), and something stable to wrap the string around. there are plenty videos of how to make it. if you want I could find one. it’s all basically the same though.