YoYoFactory 2010 G5 Resurrected


#1

When I got this the string was not looped around the bearing but instead tied in a knot, there were 4 more knots in the once yellow string. Badly banged rims. But what was the worst was the fact it was 30/1000th off, I thought it was an axle, no such luck. Had to use a small plastic/rubber hammer to fine tune it. When I started it wobbled so bad the string vibrated. Roughly about an hour and a half of sanding, polishing and tuning now she plays perfect.


#2

That looks awesome

Now tell me more about this hammer technique…


#3

That looks incredible!


#4

I use a digital caliper to measure the width of the yoyo in several spots the entire circumference, find and mark the widest spot and use a small hammer to readjust the width, tapping on the outside of the rim. Do this several times until I get consistent readings. This I would only do on one that was really bad as I had nothing too lose. I got it within 3/1000th of an inch 1.467" to 1.470". It is very smooth now almost no vibe.


#5

So, do you think the hub was bent?

Nice work resurrecting that.


#6

Yes it was the hub, the bearing seat was fine, also the axle. Had me perplexed. I couldn’t figure it out until I started to take measurements.


#7

Really nice work! I’ve used that same hammer technique with some returned yo-yos that are really beat up, it’s pretty effective.


#8

Very cool! But how did you know the bearing seat was fine? Visual inspection?


#9

Hes just visually checked clearance between the bearing and the seat through an eye piece.


#10

What a transformation! That looks amazing, you wouldn’t think it was the same yoyo! Really impressive work. :o


#11

Actually, considering there is a micrometer there and he is getting these very exact figures I’d guess he checked the bearing seat tolerances as well to see perfect it was.


#12

Looks good! Props to you for fixing it . I think the polished rims make it look better.


#13

Hey, that’s what I do too haha. If you want it even smoother, shave down the spacer part of the bearing seat down a tiny bit, until all of it is level and no one part is deeper or taller than the other.