What is the average life span of a metal unresponsive yoyo

Uploading: 20210209_141504.jpg… this is my yoyo

Decades, probably? Unless you damage it

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If it’s taken care of it will last a lot longer than you will.

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If you take your yoyo with you everywhere you go. It will last very very long as long as you don’t drive around crossing guards when a train is coming.

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Your image link doesn’t work.

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It will last as long as you take care of it. My oldest unresponsive metal is 10 years old and counting, has been well loved but well treated.

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Looks like your yo-yo’s lifespan… :sunglasses: … was below average.

YEEEEAAAHH! (sorry)

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Can you try to get that photo up here again?

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Barring basic maintenance/parts replacement (really just bearing, response pads, and string), the only limiting factor is damage. So it should last you a lifetime if you keep it pristine.

I mean, you see people posting here from time to time plastic yoyos from like 20 years ago. There’s not much in a yoyo that can fail that can’t be easily replaced.

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I’ve got a Silver Bullet from Tom Kuhn that’s still throwing strong after 30+ years.

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I have some throws that are pushing 17 years of use. Outside of scuffs and as needed bearing maintenance they will likely last forever.

Depending on the material the same goes for many plastics I own as well.

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Ditto. Don’t throw it so much anymore, but it even has the original bearing.

I’ve got some wood and plastic yoyos, right up there as well.

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It’s especially important to be careful with the yoyo’s tapped threads. I try to avoid opening my yoyos as much as possible (I pick out knots) and I’m careful to make sure that everything is lined up well when I’m screwing a yoyo back together. Be sure not to over tighten the yoyo. And I also usually add a tiny amount of lubricant to the threads to reduce wear.

This is a reason why I really like One Drop yoyos with Side Effects. They do pose some disadvantages like adding more centre weight and often needing extra attention to line up the yoyo halves to tune out vibe. BUT they have an axle system that is made of 7075 aluminum (very strong) with long axles (more threads to spread out pressure). And the whole axle system is replaceable, meaning that if you did manage to damage the threads, you could just swap it out with new SEs. I love it!

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With replaceable string and bearings I would say a yoyo will last until you damage it.

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700k years

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Sorry about that it just that the image failed to load but here it is

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I thought you wore out the yoyo or that it was almost destroyed or something. The Node is a great yoyo. I have one and gave a few away. Take care if it and it will be enjoyed by your great grandchildren.

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I tried thinking of this from the perspective relating to aluminum bats as they seem to deaden at some point, but of course impact is the factor there. On a smaller level I thought the micro vibrations could impact fatigue but it would be very high cycle fatigue. Not sure if that HCF would cause work hardening though. Need to brush up on my materials science and mechanics of materials textbooks. I do think the resonance would change over time. Don’t know the temper of the aluminum or the alloy but something like 7075 can age naturally to t73

Not sure what the lifespan of a yo-yo is or how you could be certain if it was completely dead, but if you throw it enough to feel you wore it out, at least you should feel like you got your money’s worth.

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