Tips to increase my sleeper time?


#1

I’m an intermediate player still playing responsive. I just upgraded from my Velocity to a DM II and I like it a lot so far. But my sleeper is still too weak to do a full three rotations on Brain Twister most of the time. What can I do to improve my spin time? Any tips to improve my throw?


#2

Try starting your throw with your hand a bit higher it might increase your power a bit. Try to pop in that unresponsive bearing to try it out, you’d be surprised with how much longer spins you’ll get.


#3

Honestly just go unresponsive, i just started yo-yoing a month ago and started with and unresponsive yoyo, it was hard at first but completely worth the struggle.


#4

With a trick like brain twister people tend to rub the side of the yoyo with the string, to solve this problem keep the string centered. Try to consciously watch were your string is at all times!
-Jansen


#5

^^ What he said. It’s less about the power of the throw (though that’s important) and more about not losing the power you’ve already got.


#6

Get a real yoyo. :o


#7

The dm2 is a a well made yoyo, you shouldn’t make him/her make it feel like it’s the equipments fault.


#8

Yeah what do you mean by that? I can do Ladder escape twice on the spin time of my DM2.


#9

If your throw isn’t straight, practice that throw so that your string won’t touch the edge. Once you got that right, start throwing harder.


#10

It’s not even the straightness of the throw that Jansen and I are talking about. It’s during execution of a trick, the player has to make sure the segments don’t start touching the walls beyond a reasonable degree. The more aligned you can keep the segments with each other, the less spin you’re going to lose.


#11

Do what most of the folks in this thread are saying, watch the sides of your gap, raise your arm a bit before your throw. My suggestion is to snap your wrist as you bring the yoyo down. It’s more of a hard flick really, I find it creates extra spin on the way down. Moving your entire arm hard won’t necessarily make your throw stronger, it takes both finesse and a bit of strength.

Following through on the throw also helps, coming to a stop early in the motion will give you an off axis throw. The end of your throw should mean that your arm is extended at the elbow.

I hope this makes sense.


#12

I did notice when I first got my DM II that the responsive bearing did not like to be on the string for very long without dying. I think the gap is just a little too small for silicone pads. I would suggest switching out of for unresponsive and working on binds. They aren’t as scary as most people think.

-----Jeremy


#13

There is actually a technique in which you can change the tilt of the yoyo. It goes like this: you have to take the string and either twist it tight or loosen it. Experiment with that. It improves your spin times massively.


#14

Also snap your wrist as much as you can


#15

I would actually like to comment on how the string is wrapped around the yoyo. I’ve noticed with responsive yoyo’s you don’t get much of a bind on the yoyo, but playing with an unresponsive yoyo and actually binding yourself you are able to get the string wrapped much tighter around the yoyo, thereby increasing the amount the yoyo itself has to spin off the string, rather than the bearing letting the loose string slip past.


#16

can you elaborate a little? I don’t exactly need help on my spin times but I was a little confused


#17

Essentially, Bind>responsive bearing, as far as getting a tightly wrapped yoyo string is concerned. Does that make more sense?


#18

how does it affect spin time? the throw i’m assuming?


#19

When the string is loose around the yoyo, the bearing can spin and the string can all be unwound easily without the yoyo spinning, this often happens when using a responsive bearing. If the string is tightly bound to the yoyo, pulling the string will not result in it being unwound from the yoyo. Simple way to try this is to wrap the string around the yoyo by hand, and then pull on it without allowing the yoyo to spin. Then throw and bind the yoyo and try the same thing.

Logically, when you throw the yoyo, it is sped up both by your arm flicking it, and the fact that it is unwinding itself. If the bearing allows the string to come unwound without the yoyo spinning, you miss out on a lot of torque.


#20

Use a BTH and a twelve foot string.