The Money Thread


#1

This thread is for all of the people that aren’t quite old enough to have a job and are not too sure about how they can get a little extra cash to stock up on some new throws -

That being said anyone (not really my choice) can post tips and trick for this sort of thing like making accesories or whatever!

(disclaimer: this is just a test to see if people like it)


#2

Mow some lawns, it’s warming up now


#3

Do not get caught.


(Owen) #4

There are many illegal alternatives if you feel like the honest road is too narrow for you.


#5

^^^
Good advise guys!


#6

Thanks for the positive input!


#7

Okay, though, seriously.


#8

Beg your parents for money?


#9

It’s not that hard to figure out how to make money… I mean if you google it you can find ways how… I mean you can babysit it’s not that hard to figure out.


#10

You’re throwing around a yoyo all the time right? Just do it on the street with a tip jar in front of you. You won’t get tons of money the first time you try it, but the better you get the more you’ll make. If you plan on competing, it will also help a lot with audience engagement and being comfortable on stage.
(Depending on where you live you may need a permit for this kind of activity, so look into that before you get started. )

You could also make and sell your own handmade goods via something like ebay or esty. Yoyo strings, hand carved wooden counterweights, and paracord bracelets are examples where the raw material is cheap, which will make it easier to turn a profit. Your parents might even provide some capital if you show them that you have a clear business plan.

I knew a very poor kid in high school that got into an expensive college, and managed to pay for his 1st semester of tuition by selling musubis and home-made candies at school. There were also people that bought snacks in bulk at costco and sold them for $1-$3 a piece (whereas they paid ~$0.25).


#11

Unfortunately, it doesn’t work that way… I wish it would, but laypeople don’t care about your level, they want you to eli hop and gyro flop all the way…


#12

Seriously, mow some lawns. Find old people, or people that work a lot, or single moms, or anybody that’s lazy or doesn’t have the time, and offer to mow their lawn. You can charge something like 10 bucks per lawn (depending on size) and then maybe 5 more or so to edge? Do it enough, and you’ll make some good money. Summer is coming up too, so once you’re out of school you can look for even more clients.

Say you mow 10 lawns a week for $15 a piece. That’s $150, or a new CLYW (or whatever other expensive throw you’re looking at) every single week.


#13

Not sure where you live, but in the area I live in (which is very cheap compared to the national average), people charge between 25 and 50 bucks to mow lawns. I feel like $15 would be undercutting oneself.


(major_seventh) #14

^^ Dang that’s a preeetty nice pay. I’d charge like 10-15 :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

Man, if I could get 25 to 50 bucks mowing a lawn, I’d probably quit my job and just do that! I have some friends that used to mow lawns, but I’ve never asked them what they charge. That’s pretty decent money if people are willing to pay that much


#16

They pay it all day everyday. Of course, they’ve got crews of people and zero-turn mowers. They’ll finish a 2 lot yard in an hour, edging and all. For the quickness and convenience, it’s almost worth it. I push mow my own lawn though being completely honest. Nice way to spend part of a weekend day.


#17

So that’s a full blown commercial outfit rate then, not some neighborhood kid trying to make a few bucks.


#18

True, but $20 for a lawn would put you in high competition and feels a lot better in the pocket than $10. Besides, a young fella/lady could easily get some customers if they’ve got a little spiel about entrepreneurship and trying to get ahead early in life. People generally admire that kind of industrious spirit in a kid.


#19

Well, I’m getting chickens, so I guess I can sell a few extra eggs that the chickens make but we can’t seem to eat.


#20

I ref soccer games in the fall, split wood in the spring, in the summer I volunteer at the library but I want to get another job (most likely lawn work or something similar), in the winter I do inside things like making contact or recipe databases.