Running


(Cinimod105) #1

I was just wondering, is anybody here a runner/running enthusiast?


(DOGS) #2

I run/jog for an hour or so a day, as part of my workout. Nothing incredible just track or treadmill. I need new shoes though.


#3

I use to run a lot. I did a trail half marathon. Now day I just kinda lost my motivation.


(Cinimod105) #4

Do you guys have any tips for running? Like technique, etc.


#5

If you are running breath from the stomach not the chest. Breathing from the chest wastes energy.


#6

I don’t run, I sprint. :wink:
I’m a 100m sprinter/ 110 and 300 hurdler/ long jumper.
distance running has never really caught my eye, but running is fun. as far as technique, breathe in though your nose, out through your mouth. If you get a side stitch, when you breathe out, blow like you’re blowing out candles. I’ve found that helps
and if you’re sprinting, you want to really pump your arms, and not move them across your body.
keep good posture, and alternate your steps while breathing. By that, I mean breathe in when you step with your right, then breathe out when you step on your left. then breathe in when you step with your left, and back out with your right. this is the best way I’ve found to avoid side stitches all together.


(Cinimod105) #7

I want to ask, for distances of 2.4km(about 1.5 miles) and above, is it a good idea to take big strides (high knee action and fully extended back leg)? Or should I take smaller steps and keep my knees low, relying mainly on my calf muscles to propel myself?


#8

my fat ass needs to run …


#9

uhh honestly I’m not really sure, because I don’t do distance running like… almost ever. Last time I did a distance run (which was only 4 miles) I had the most raging shin splints. I tried competing at a meet that week but ended up dropping out of all my events because it hurt too bad. I had to rest for about a week-a week and a half to recover.
I’m going off on a tangent though, back to your question. I would think longer strides would be better, so you could go further faster and with less energy wasted. Relying mostly on your calves would probably tire them out after a shorter distance.
But again, I’m not a distance guy, so you should probably get more opinions on that before taking my word.


#10

I run 4 miles a week and my advice is stay hydrated, keep your back straight so your lungs could be expanded instead of slouching when running, and pace yourself.


(Cinimod105) #11

Does anybody run marathons/half-marathons here?


#12

I did one for a funraising track meet


#13

I run the mile and the half-mile in track. I’m in 7th grade and this is only my second year running, but I’ve progressed a lot. I just try to drink a lot of water the day before and the day of track meets which I think helps a lot.


#14

I’ve been running cross country for 5 years, I was never much good until this year, our team won state.

Mid-foot striking can really help, and you want to be sure that you don’t over-pronate or over-supinate. In distance running, arm movement can be very important, you want to move your arms from the shoulders rather than the elbows, which many distance runners have a tendency to do. Stay hydrated, train hard, don’t run the same run every day, you need to alternate long runs (Mine ranges 6-12 miles depending on the day) and shorter more intense workouts (tempo, fartleks, etc.)

When it comes to stride length, find what feels natural, it just depends on how you run.

Warm up and cool down, this is important and will help to reduce pain/injury, protein intake within 30 minutes of your workouts will help that as well.

I’m not a great runner by any means, but I know a but about distance running, and I’ll do my best to answer any questions you have.

Oh, and have fun, that’s important. Running with friends/teammates can help a lot and push you to improve. When you have fun it makes everything much easier.


#15

I’m a 5k runner


#16

Same.


#17

I run track and cross country, but my absolute favorite is cross country because I love distance. It hurts, but once you do it for a month it stops because you get stronger. For those sprinters who want distance advice, put your time in. The more practice time you put in, the better you will be. Vary your workouts from a very long run, like 12 miles, to 100’s, and everything in between. Make sure you have proper form, not slamming your ankles into the ground but rather running on your toes, and practice running really steep hills. It hurts worse than anything else, but THAT is where you can win or lose a race


#18

I am going to run 100 m and 200 m at our zone meet. Also wondering what peoples times are in 100 m?


#19

Um… I run a 19:16 5k, if that helps…

Haven’t run anything less than a 400 for time in years.


#20

Lol. What’s your 400 time than?