q about bearing


#1

How long would it take to break in a dry yyf spec bearing and how come some of my yyf spec bearing don’t spin like they us to after a week of play


#2

Spec Bearings come dry,and therefor use little or no time to break in.They also have no C-Clips,So you can’t deshield it.As for the second question,How does it not spin like it does?


#3

When I got my 888x every time I finish a combo it still spins very fast now when I’m halfway in the combo it spins out.


#4

You should contact YYF about that.


#5

All SPEC bearings come dry and can’t be de-shielded so cleaning won’t be as much use.


#6

According to my personal experience, my SPEC bearing is not de-shieldable.


#7

I will.And about the posts above, its my mistake, sorry.


#8

I found the problem now it’s my 888x, I took the spec bearing out of my 88x and put it on my Wooly Marmot and it payed wonderful. It might have been because my friend borrowed my 888x and he accidentally dropped it and gave it a big ding.

Thanks for the help anyway :wink:


#9

I share in your experiences. I usually don’t have much luck with SPEC bearings at all. Let me ask you this: had you removed the bearing using pliers before the problems started? (Pre-emptive: don’t if you haven’t already)


#10

I did use pliers,otherwise i wouldn’t be able to get it out.


#11

Yes I used pliers. And also my spec bearing on my Wooly Marmot became tug responsive, I don’t know what could have caused it to go responsive.


#12

Spec bearing are terrible in the 888x. You should get a center-trac, thats what they come with nowadays


#13

Here’s why I asked about using pliers. In my experience, using pliers and squeezing the bearing while prying it off the bearing seat tends to warp the outer race of the bearing and thus throw off the entire construction. SPECs seem to be more prone to this than others - I’ve actually shattered one into a million pieces this way.

I learned this trick from another forum member and it has yet to fail me. Instead of gripping the bearing from the outside, find something that will fit snugly in the inside race of the bearing - the smooth end of a drill bit is what he suggested and what I’ve been using. Jiggle the drill bit and the bearing should come off after a little bit with minimal to no damage to the bearing itself. This is also a trick that works amazingly to remove those extremely tight bearings (think Boss and 44). Use this method from now on and it should save you some bearings down the road.


(Mi) #14

Don’t listen to this person. ^ They know not of what they speak. Spec bearing is just as good as a Center-trac. They’re the same thing, only one has a dip in it and is way noisier. I recommend Spec bearing if your throw is reliably straight which it should be if you’re using a metal.


#15

What Mi said.A flat bearing is as good as any other if you have a a good and straight throw.


#16

Thanks ;D


(Hardcore_Max) #17

That is quite interesting that someone else has come across this. I have been thinking that I have been going bonkers. Thinking that I have been slightly deforming the outer races when I remove the Spec bearings with the plier method thus reducing spin time. It is strange though that it only has been occuring to the YYF spec bearings, I don’t use any stronger force on the Spec bearings than I would use removing any other brand of bearing.


#18

Well I’m thinking that the fact that it will shatter in the first place leads me to believe the material of the outer race itself is relatively weak. Because I agree with you HardcoreMax, Even while using the same amount of force as with any other bearing, removing SPECs (specifically) using pliers does not seem to have a happy ending.


#19

Maybe I just said it wrong. If you use pliers to remove SPEC bearings, it’s not a guarantee that you’ll damage the bearing. But the rate of failure is undoubtedly much higher. While the plier method is tried and true in nearly all cases, the drill bit method was something I had just suggested as an alternative and what I find to be a safer and more successful method as well as provide my attempt to provide solution to address to the poster’s original concern.


#20

I have another question: When do I have to replace my bearing? because I’ve read that when a bearing is making a loud grinding noise its broken, because the bearing on my Superstar is making a really loud grinding noise.