Help/advice for a newbie


#1

I’ve recently graduated to the advanced tricks in the learn section. So far I’ve used a Yomega wing and Yomega Raider for beginner tricks, and a YYF One with half-spec bearing for intermediate tricks. All three have worked out great, and they’ve made my acclimation to throwing quite enjoyable. That is, until I switched to the full-spec bearing.

Since I’ve switched out the bearing in my YYF One I feel completely lost, overwhelmed, even frustrated at times. In my quest for consistent, clean binds, I’ve spent more time hand-winding my yoyo than I have practicing. I suppose switching back to the half-spec would help my transition into the advanced tricks, but is that wise? Wouldn’t that just be delaying the issues I’m having now?

I’m also questioning the feasibility of hand-starting the YYF One with a full spec. Despite my best effort, the yoyo simply wobbles violently out of control without even the slightest indication of winding the string. So far I am successfully completing about 60 percent of my bind attempts. Roughly 50 percent of those attempts result in a yoyo with a little ‘tail’ hanging out. I’ve heard this results from “throwing the string into the gap,” but I’m not sure I’m actually doing that.

Can anyone give advice, pointers, or even anecdotes regarding the transition to an unresponsive yoyo, handing winding, and those funky little tails?

Thanks!


#2

You need to bind the yoyo after you flick start it. It will look pretty sketchy, but just throw it and bind again and it should be good.


#3

Try practicing to bind with the Half-Spec bearing to get a good feel on it.


#4

I would, while binding, pinch the string being held by your non throw hand with your non throw hand index and thumb as you are binding.


#5

yeah most of binding is trial and error in my experience, you have to kind of figure it out.


#6

Thanks all! I think finding that happy medium between too much, and too little string on the loop helps with the tails I was getting.

Like you’ve all said, it pretty much comes down to a ton of practice.