AyeShawn yoyoing hate?


#1

So, I am a 14 year old Asian yoyoer, and to be more specific, Japanese and Chinese. So at school, I used to get teased by bick boys (juniors), thinking they were tough guys picking on an Asian kid. They all say, “Dude, yoyoing??? That’s so Asian.” I just don’t get it. I mean, I’m not bothered by it but where do people get the idea that yoyoing is strictly for Asians!?!?!??!??!??

[b]Admin Edit: Please note the change I made to your post. Lets not use those words anymore.

Thanks Icthus[/b]


#2

Because the most viewed video on youtube about yoyoing has an Asian in it? Not sure why people think that… Maybe it’s because a large number of yoyoers are Asian.


#3

It seems anything skill related is “too asian”. I just accept the stereotype and move on, not much you can do to change it.


#4

what he said^

It’s a stereotype. If someone’s good at something, it’s because he’s Asian. You’ve probably seen those “Difficulty: Asian” comments.
I think it’s also the same reason that Marcus Koh didn’t get half the publicity that Jensen did when he won worlds. He just won “because he’s Asian and Asians are good at everything so of course he won.”


#5

Because we’re better than everyone else ;D Just kidding, just kidding lol.


#6

There’s truth behind every joke…


(⛷ Noisy Lurker) #7

There are those that will always try to create doubt in others. If it’s not race it’s something else. They generally do this in front of others as they, themselves are the one with issues of self worth. It seems that they feel to direct negative attention toward others, some how lifts them above others and protects them. Such a foolish premise to base your actions on.

It’s not everyone that can follow their heart. If what you do takes you ina positive direction, makes life enjoyable, hurts no one, and helps you develop and grow as a person it’s good!

To bad so many are so lost. Just remember when you meet these people how terrified they must be for someone to realize how incredibly lacking they are. Good to be you, sad to be them.

It’s easier to fly higher when you are lifting others up because when you start to fall others will remember your efforts and will help you catch yourself before you have fallen to far.


#8

And what are those bullies doing? Football? Baseball? Barely passing classes?

WE make choices. We can either make choices WE want to make based on what WE want to do, or we can make choices based strictly on what other people want us to do. Sometimes those things overlap, but that usually means it’s often a good choice, although it can be a bad choice at times.

If you enjoy the yoyo, then don’t let anyone change your mind. It ain’t “so asian”, it’s “so fun”, but granted, it takes an EFFORT, which means that many people really won’t be willing to put in the time and energy into this in order to be able to enjoy it.

The teenage years suck. Peer pressure sucks. Rise above it Don’t let someone else impose their “point of view” over you. You’ll find this to be handy later on in life.


(Alex Fairhurst) #9

I’m white and I like to yoyo.

No one ever hated on me for it, not even in high school. I had all the cool kids doing it.


#10

I was on the wrestling and football team in high school and showed off my yoyo…I’m white and Jewish …I don’t understand the whole false stereotype thing…anyone can yoyo…just gotta have brains and a heart.


#11

Huh? There are plenty of bullies out there that are far smarter than you, buddy. Are football and baseball for some reason less noble pursuits than yoyoing?

I find it hilarious you’re in a thread about overcoming stereotypes, yet you say things like people who play Football and Baseball barely pass their classes and are all bullies. Absurd, sir.

Kid, next time somebody talks shit about you playing yoyo because you’re Asian, bash their nose in with it. Problem solved.


(Khent G) #12

They are just stereotyping because they are insecure?


#13

That’s probably the worst advice you can give. funny, coming from the guy who’s probably a baseball or football, player, and whaddya know, he picks the violent, aggressive choice. As if punching someone would make his “Problem solved”. He’d only get in trouble, and tarnish the good reputations that yoyoers have, because normally we’re kind, accepting people who just want to have good, clean fun.


#14

You stated that you “used to” get teased. I’m wondering how or why the teasing came to an end (good news). You also stated that you are “not bothered” by it (good news). In light of that, unless you ask someone who says something like that directly, you might never know for sure. I think if it’s in the past, does not bother you, and those people are not around to dialogue about it anyway, don’t invest energy in trying to make sense of it now.

I know you had to pick your battles, but if it happened in school, back then, you could have brought it to staff attention and said, " hey, not for nothing, but the kid said what I was doing is “so Asian” and while I don’t think people need to get in trouble…I want to know where he’s coming from." I would have used the school setting and staff as a forum to get a better understanding. Use the adults to mediate it. Whoever said that would have to think about what they said and why. That was your only shot at a real answer.

Those same kids tend to grow up and enter the workforce written up for hostile work environment or other nonsense. I think it is better for everyone’s sake that the schools catch it early on.

Glad it’s over.


#15

Actually, I’m a 6’01" 130lb. tennis player and golfer.

Do you know how many times I was harassed in High School? Once. Make your own conclusions as to why people never messed with me again. Violence may not always be the answer, but if you’re too much of a puss to fight somebody when you should, you’ll get stepped on the rest of your life.

If somebody were to act negatively towards me, my friends, family, acquaintances… over something such as race, sexual preference, religion, lack of religion… you better believe they would have to be wheeled away from that encounter, and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that. There are, in fact, people that need to be put in their place.


#16

I find offenese in studio’s barely passing remark…I barely passed some if my classes …but they were AP calculus and physics …but still, implying that people who play big end sports are bullie offends me as well. I played those sports in high school and managed to.graduate Magna cum laude. And I yoyo. But sometimes a good punch in the face does help with geting rid of a bully. Trust me, ignoring bullies doesn’t work. I was bullied most of my life. If a punch to the face works, and you have tried other reasonings, then go right ahead. Bullies need to be put in their place.


#17

I think both you and Mikers are reading too much into Studio42’s comments. He didn’t accuse all sports guys of being bullies. Just relax.


#18

Exactly!

I’m used to play baseball!

I play basketball!

I’m really nice! :wink:


#19

Now wait a minute. I played NCAA Div1 Soccer - and I’m a …ok never mind. :-[

Seriously though, I just have to comment on the postings about dealing with bullies. I grew up as the only white kid in inner-city Philadelphia surrounded by predominantly African American neighborhoods. I can personally attest to the FACT that ignoring bullies will not work.It will only lead to more bullying. The only thing that works is convincing a bully that you are simply not worth their time and they will find a softer target.

Think about it. Who picks on the Badger?


#20

Violence should never be the answer. I had a friend who was picked on and eventually punched in the face. But, because he chose not to fight back, he got in no trouble and the other guy now has a record for assault. Guess who got the last laugh.