Yoyo camp?


#1

If this already exists please tell me but I think someone needs to start a yoyo camp. You go there for a weekend or a week or 2 and do nothing but learn how to yoyo. I don’t know about you guys but I think I would learn a lot faster if I had someone to teach me in person! It took me 2 days to get matrix down ok and atomic bomb is really driving me crazy… I just can’t get it right! I can’t imagine how long it takes to learn the master tricks :frowning:


#2

in person actually can help quite a bit. like I couldn’t get ninja vanish down, but then yoshi showed me in person, and it was like ohhh, that’s all you do?

What I’d recommend is just finding some kind of a meet up in your area. :slight_smile:
Most of the time people there can help each other out with new stuff.


#3

There is no meet up anywhere near me that I can find :frowning: Actually until just yesterday I couldnt find any other throwers under a 3 hour drive. I am hoping to meet up with a guy I found online yesterday who is about an hour or so from me. I hope he’s in the mood to be a mentor!


#4

I think a good idea would be for a company(manufacturer or reseller) to do a "nationwide tour, but they’d need to see some sort of “pre-sales” kind of thing. Say, let’s say, for $20-50, you can enter the 2-4 hour “camp”. Maybe $20 gets you unlimited group instruction with some possible one on one time with the instructor(s). The higher pop payers would be entitled to X-amount of one on one time with a “yoyo expert” who is most likely a competition-grade player(maybe not a competitor but can play at that level) who can teach or instruct. You can also offer a “sales area” with demonstrators who can do basic Q&A and let people try stuff. This area would be free, as some people might just want to shop, or for parents to hang around in. The sales area can be sponsored by other vendors(pending approval) and other yoyo manufacturers and accessories, which can help off-set some of the potential costs.

The problem with this is two-fold. We can always get people saying “yes, we are interested, please come”, which has to be weighed against the gamble of how many people WILL show up, WILL pay and those who pay in advance. It can be expensive to do this, especially if you’re doing “fly dates” rather than a “bus tour”, although there are pros and cons either way, as wel as the possibility that a bus tour can be as costly as fly dates.

Also, where are these events going to be held? Schools may like the idea of an activity for the kids, and it can be an “in school field trip”. Those can be demonstrations with some hands on only, but very time limited for the most part, but trust me, schools might be willing to bite depending on price. This is similar to my concept, which is an exposure program: show some videos, do some demonstrations, answer some questions. Mine would be free and within driving distance. The idea is to give kids ANOTHER idea of things to do in order to get them off the couch. The “camp” or “in school field trip” would be at a more intense level, based more on a better demonstration and perhaps better hands on AND longer.

Hotels and convention centers can be expensive. Renting halls can get costly. Where would it be appropriate? Comic book stores and hobby stores seem likely options, plus it gets more feet through their doors and may result in additional sales. Seeing a “big yoyo market”, they might choose to carry a few product lines as a result.

YoYo clubs would be great. They already SHOULD have some basic organization, even if it means they meet in a park. But then there’s the debate over is it worth it? I am not in any club nor have inquired into going to one or a meeting, so the issue is “do we have enough talent to further our skills collectivity and be able to share this with new people” vs. bringing in “camp experts”, which they’d have to raise funds for and then cold sell tickets if they wanted to. Clubs that have the proper talent in their roster and the willingness to organize and teach can do regional “camps” for reduced costs(or none to the attendees).

If we thnk about it, there’s camps for band, cheerleading, football, soccer and other sports. The buy-in costs for ALL of those activities is higher. For my kids to play soccer, there is a store that charges I think $28 for little kids for a starter pack if they are in a recreational league that includes a pair of socks, Size 3 ball and boots. I know those cheerleading camps can get expensive. Band camps often require you own the instrument, which most at that level DO own their own instruments. But there are plenty of “you go there” camps. I know there is a major national cheerleading campe and you go to it, not the other way around. This might be easier from a logistical point of view. But, now you have to get people to come. I think the WANT is there. But, thinking from the point of view as a parent(as I a one), and honestly, as much as I am enjoying yoyo, I don’t think I’d spring for the costs associated with shipping them somewhere, plus I’d have to go to keep an eye on them(doubling travel costs).

Then again, parents spring big dollars for their kids to go to anime, comic and toy/hobby conventions. So, what do know?

I think the idea of a yoyo camp would be fun, and I think would be enjoyed. But I can’t see it being more than a day. Even when I went to a soccer camp, it was for 4 hours a day for 10 business days. But we’re talking about group and individual instruction and like 100 kids in it and only 4 pros in it, including one who owned one of the best soccer stores in the region.

What I see better would be comic book stores and hobby stores associating with yoyo players, and vice versa, and then ornganize “yoyo day” or “yoyo weekend”. The local big hobby shop is focused on RC stuff, so they have regular RC swap meets, but they also sell yoyos(Duncan, Yomega, YYF Fast201s).

Me personally, I’d like some personal instruction. I think that would be great. But it looks a little strange with a 40-year old guy is going to a camp that is realistically targeting kids, because that is their main client base(funded by their 40-year old parents…)


#5

Duncan does a tour every year and YYF did it this year.


#6

@Studio

My hockey camps cost around $750. lol

Edit:

I would want to go to a yoyo camp, but I doubt my parents would let me go unless it was super cheap.


#7

I loved the yyf tour. Alex Kato helped me with magic drop and they were just helping everyone one on one. I was great just to finally meet other yoyoers too.


#8

I had a friend go to cheerleader camp. Cost over $20K all told.

I went to band camp. It was 4 weeks before school started in high school. It was so the band would be ready for the football games. 2 hours a day, 5 days a week and NOT mandatory(but highly recommended). Free.

I’m new to this yoyo thing, so up until recently, I was not looking for stuff. Perhaps next year I’ll catch word of the Duncan tour.


#9

Every summer, there is a yoyo camp at my old school. The guys who run Yoyo University run it. But, I don’t know where you live… so :-\ . But anyway, its pretty cool. I think there should be more in more areas


#10

Woah, cheerleaders must earn a lot of money!


#11

That would be a fun thing to do :slight_smile: I like the idea, maybe it wouldn’t take me 2 weeks to get and whut down lol. Just now moving to video three…


#12

Cheerleading turned into a cash cow industry. Now that competitions are very very mainstream and get national television coverage, some cheerleading squads get more cash than the sports team they are cheering on. Parents want their kids to “be the best” and so they spend hard. But, on the other side of things, the cost is somewhat justified. It’s typically all inclusive of hotel and airfare/travel and food. The trainers are highly trained. There’s lots of safety involved, as well as expensive insurance. I’m sure you’ve heard of cheerleaders getting seriously injured in tosses(broken necks, backs, arms, legs, pelvis… serious!). There’s lots of expensive training equipment, high priced speakers(presenters) and instructors making “celebrity appearances” at bloated pay rates. It’s the kind of job where I can say, as a sound engineer, “What, you need me for 2 whole weeks? Well, it’s $2400/day” and I get it without the bat of an eye kind of money going into these camps.