What is mint and near mint?


#1

when a yoyo is played alot but have no dings and scratches is it mint?


#2

Sort of. “Mint” itself generally needs to be qualified… if it’s been used, it’s not truly “Mint” because it’s not straight from the mint as it were (ie. like untouched coins).

But I think it’s fair enough for someone to say “in Mint condition” if that’s actually true, which it rarely is. It seems commonplace to say “Mint” as short-form for “in Mint condition” which is where the confusion lies.

If you’re wondering for your own BST, just say “in mint condition”.


#3

thanks ^^


#4

#5

Not this:

https://fbcdn-sphotos-b-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/546847_228638673932913_1485349359_n.jpg


(Owen) #6

Mint: 100% like new. No dings, anno flaws, pinpricks, “hairline” scratches or any other form of damage. Can have been played.

Near Mint: maybe ONE (or two, tops) small pinprick(s) (extremely small ding)


#7

Maybe I’m just crazy, but here’s how it would be for me in an ideal world:

“Mint” : literally untouched since the day it came from the manufacturer.

“Mint condition”: OK, so it may have been touched or even thrown, but it has sustained zero damage as a result. Literally zero damage. None. Even the pads should be as new as they can be for a dozen throws or so.

“Near mint”: Good luck finding any damage; you might find a hairline scratch or a non-breaking pinprick somewhere.

etc…

Main point is to distinguish between “Mint” and “Mint Condition”. They are not the same thing in my opinion.


(Owen) #8

Oh yup, my bad. Mint is like straight from the “Mint” (where they make monies) and untouched

Mint condition is used but still like it was day 1.


#9

i would describe your “mint” as “brand new in box”, or “bnib”.


#10

I personally feel there’s only 2 states here: mint or not mint. There is no near mint. Near mint is not mint.

While the word “mint” does have it’s discrepancies in meaning from one person to another, it ultimately does have a sole characteristic - no damage at all to the yoyo. Having to replace used response has never really bothered me.

Near mint gets people in all kinds of trouble because one person’s idea of slight damage is not always the same as another’s. So if I sell or trade something, I either list it as mint (no damage) or not mint (and I list all of the damage).

In the end, good pics make the sale/trade, though.


#11

“Not mint” status shouldn’t be limited to cosmetic damage. Mediablasts will wear off with time and handling, possibly dulling the vibrancy of the color in the process. Likewise, sometimes colors will rub off for no particular reason, presumably due to sloppy anodization technique. Also, nickel tarnishes… polish wears off… raw aluminum collects fine scratches… vibe can be induced from nothing more than unscrewing a yoyo once. None of these things are the handler’s fault, and they can occur no matter how careful you are.

Generally speaking, if you’ve gotten much use out of a yoyo, you should be very judicious about using a word as prickly as “mint,” which some people take very literally. There are plenty of other words in the English language to choose from, and you should use as many of them as necessary to be as accurate as possible.