Same tricks over and over again?


#1

Excuse me if this comes off as a rant, but I need to get this ‘message’ across.

Why is that some people, if not most, criticize a yoyoer for doing the same tricks over and over again. This is more evident to contest players such as Hiroyuki Suzuki/Mickey, who I believe gets the worst out of all those kinds of criticisms.

I mean, if it’s an original trick and it’s their own style, shouldn’t that be enough? I’ve seen way too many players doing the same tech stuff that it’s almost looks all the same to me that it gets boring.

In comparison, how come people don’t bag on other yoyoers who tend to do the same? I do not mean to call names, but just setting examples such as Paul Han [and don’t get me wrong, he’s one of my inspirations], Harold Owens, Takeshi Matsuura [5a, at least], and even gosh-forbid Jensen Kimmitt.

Yes, all of them do different variations of their own original tricks…but don’t they also fall into the ‘doing the same trick over and over’ thing? Because it feels like only Mickey suffers to it while others who do the same get away with it.

I would like to discuss this in a civil manner.

I apologize for my poor use of English, and if any of you actually understood and want to make it clearer for other readers, feel free to summarize it more. I do not want this to be a flamewar, but a good well-mannered discussion.

Thanks.

EDIT: Sorry for pulling a Studio42 xD


#2

I completely agree with you how players shouldn’t be constantly bagged on for repeating tricks. If it works, then keep doing it until it doesn’t anymore, right? The issue is just that, the community is ever evolving and those spoiled COD playing yo-yoing 12 year olds (no offense, just a joke guys) are constantly wanting new stuff thinking that winning is everything. The players, despite repeating tricks, deserve more respect thatn they are given. It takes a lot to get to that level in the pro league.

IMO: Just do what you know you can do. If it works, then it works. It’s still hard, and technical, and takes a huge amount of skill. Besides, smoothness is a factor, and repating all those tricks does help.


#3

Those same people don’t realize that creating a trick is tough…let alone make it so that you can land it almost every time within contest conditions [stage fright, nerves, bla bla bla]. Heck, even coming up with transitions to different mounts/tricks is also tough. Everything is tough.

I remember when people criticized Gentry Stein for using the same freestyle he did at PNWR at Cal States. Like…there was only a one week window between the two contests and he couldn’t make a whole new routine to satisfy the kids without messing up. Oh, he got so much heat because of that. =[

Yes, I understand that Mickey has been using the same certain combos for years and years. But again, if it works it works and it’s still enough to place him high. And in extension, those are still beasty tricks.

I mean, no one complains when Paul Han does his whip combos [and snapping string] since placing 2nd on 2006 Worlds and Jensen using the same hop tricks to almost all the contests he dominated during his prime. Right?

The only change is the music and the order of the tricks/transitions.


#4

We all tend to use the same tricks again, and again, that’s natural. If I have a good feeling with a trick, it’s normal that I keep using it again and again.

Why is Mickey particularly affected? Because he’s too much awesomeness.

Mickey has been highlighted for many years now, building his own style for competition. As a competitor, he only changes what he thinks it’s worth to change from one competition to another. And seriously who can forget one of his freestyles? I mean, every yoyoer, even haters, has spent a good amount of time watching him, he has sure been the most popular competitor during the last decade. So everybody know his tricks, but everybody wants something new each competition.

Moreover, nowadays’hype goes to smoothness and innovation, people are often fed up with horizontal and speed. But those freestyles that offer such an amazing moment, those freestyles that look the same again and again, those freestyle that blow your bind by their technicality; are freestyles that have asked way too much effort to be given up because it’s outdated.

But as long as he keeps blowing minds, I see no problem watching the same tricks again and again.


#5

I say it’s a good thing to do your tricks and routines over and over. It just makes them smoother and better. Look how many times we’ve seen Andre B. Doing what he does over and over in different videos, not just the tutorials. Most of his stuff is routines he changes very little in. But look how freaking smooth and stable he is! Holy cow! Not tryin to brown nose ya Andre but I’m just trying to make a point. Our tricks and smoothness, control, overall ability ONLY grows by doing it over and over and over. I’ve seen guys get the just or hang of a trick and add it into (or come up with) a routine. It just looks sloppy. Hail to those of us who still threw 500+ more times on a trick even after we got it down good. Now its solid and even better!


#6

I can’t remember who said:

" I fear more someone who knows one combo that he made 500 times than someone who knows 500 combos that he made once."

Or something like that :stuck_out_tongue:


#7

It looks like something derived from Bruce Lee’s quote

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#8

yeah, loks like that, indeed. Whatever, you got the point ;D


#9

I would prefer to see players evolve, grow and change. I’m not talking about a wholesale change, but a natural change that comes from experience gained.

At the same time, if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

I do admit I see Mickey pulling from the same core of tricks. He’s got things he does that are very signature to him, not to say anyone else can’t do it, it’s just how he does it, it’s almost predictable. He’s still consistently placing top 5, so it’s working, no matter how you want to slice it. Even so, I still find his routines entertaining to watch.

I won’t bag on any player for doing the same stuff. If it works, it works. Plus, I’m sure many of these competitors work for MONTHS on refining and perfecting routines that they think are gonna “knock 'em dead”. Yes, we’re gonna see stuff we have seen before, maybe even can do. So what. A well choreographed routine performed cleanly is a wonderful thing to see.

I’ve been to 2 contests. I’ve run sound at those 2 contests. I got an amazing view of the contest. All I can say is “amazing”. What do I see? Hard work and practice paying off, motivating me to improve, even if just a little bit. I’ll NEVER compete, but I’ll also never be able to play at a competition level. That doesn’t matter as it’s not my goal. My goal is to get better so I can enjoy this more.