Music for a talent show


#1

Hi, um I’m going to be in a talent show, and I don’t really now what song I should use. Do you guys have any suggestions.
alrighty that’s it thank you . =1


#2

Think upbeat for the most part, but you may wish to make a custom track from bits and pieces of other songs but cut together professionally so it flows and doesn’t sound chopped up(unless you want to do that for effect). You can try to do this yourself if you want.

Also, think how you play. If you play fast, use fast music. If you play slow/flow, then use something slower, at a pace you like. If you mix it up, then maybe you need to mix up the music too.

Regardless, pick what you like and watch the lyrics so you don’t get censor issues. Also, think about where you want to do what. When you know what trick you want where, think how you are going to get from A to B to C(as in what goes in between).

When I was working with wrestling groups(UH oh. Reality check!!), as you know, the winners are known in advanced. We know how it ends. The guys will figure out what they want to do. One guy was “I want to do this, that and this other thing, and I don’t care how we get there, but I want to do those before I lose the match”. Assembling a wrestling match isn’t as difficult, as there are methods to “break” and “re-organize”.


#3

I would reccomend skrillex because they rarely have words and only a few songs have bad words. It is also good to not have many words because then people dont humm along or sing and they are paying more attention to you.


#4

I like punk rock or heavy metal for performances, but that’s just me


#5

there’s a group called ratatat that I really like, they have no words whatsoever.


#6

For some reason I just can’t get along with bands that have no words in their music… just doesn’t make sense, I guess


#7

I work with a lot of contemporary jazz, new age and fusion artists, as well as progressive rock. Often, no lyrics at all. I will say it is harder for me to keep track of songs without lyrics.


#8

Yea, that’s kinda the reason that I don’t like them. Another reason is, like if it’s by the same group but different song, it kinda sounds the same to me


#9

Did some research and listening to Skrillex.

Excuse me, gonna go purge the contents of my GI tract. Definitely ain’t my thing.

Running before it gets too messy!


#10

Man, I was performing with someone that wanted to play Taio Cruz’s Dynamite! I isn’t like it! Look at other people’s performance and if you like their music use it in yours. Hope it helped!


(JonasK) #11

Whenever you get to a point where you are turning music down for a reason, you need to question that reason. Look inwards, look at the music you listen to, and ask yourself why there needs to be text. Why is it that you don’t like music without text? Why isn’t the music enough in itself? When you know that you can answer that question without a single doubt, you have grown as a person.

This is becoming a bit of a derail, but last year I had to do a paper for music history with the topic being the relation between music and text. And there is no set answer to which side is “superior” when it comes to expression, it all comes down to the artist and your own ear.

When choosing music for a performance, try describing your own yoyoing. Tempo, dynamics, harmonies, rhythm, feel. Jumping back into the text/no text thing, you have to remember that the music is in the background, you are the star. The lyrics won’t matter as long as they aren’t insanely profane.


#12

Well, don’t forget the mastering process and controlling dynamic range. Too many mixes are normalized to zero, or are referenced too low, or compressed all to crap and all the dynamics are lost.

It’s OK to have loud and soft, but if you’re mixing different tracks, be aware of your overall volume level as well as the overall volume level of the different tracks relative to each other. Don’t mix loud and soft unless the song itself is doing it, in which case it’s part of that song. But if you cut in a LOUD part from one song following a quiet part from another song, people ain’t gonna like that. Loud to loud, soft to soft.


#13

I’m not saying that the music itself isn’t enough, I mean I love the music that plays in songs. It’s just, I like hearing the stories that people tell in their songs. Don’t get me wrong, some music in songs actually tell a story themselves, and it takes time and patients to actually find these stories in the songs, and I’d hate to waste time doing that instead of throwing.


#14

My problem with lyrics in songs is that I have very weird tastes and I don’t like about 70% of peoples’ voices, and I hate being indoctrinated. Whenever I’m listening to a song with words I find myself constantly analyzing what’s being said and if I disagree with it then it ruins the song entirely because I get too caught up in how much I dislike the singer. When there’s nothing being said I can just enjoy the music itself.


(JonasK) #15

I personal view on vocals and lyrics is that the human voice is one of the most “rooted” instruments in the world that is so varied and flexible. I feel like words tend to force a certain tone and sound, because the way you shape your mouth and throat is dictated by letters on paper. When you just make sound, you are completely free to make whatever sound you see fit. A certain Norwegian singer who used to do more standard stuff has completely changed style and opened my eyes to what the Voice really is: