Making a throw


#1

What would be the very first thing to do to make a yoyo? Me and clywcollector are gunna start a company! Is there a good place to learn CAD?


#2

And who know how to do CAD?


#3

Yes I do but I don’t have the program though autodesk inventor pro is very similar and easy to use.


#4

I know how to use inventor pretty well. took a class this past school year and each year through high school

edit: this is also an amazing place to learn some tips and tricks on autocad


#5

You want to first get a very good design going. Next you want to contact a a machinist who can do the work. I will warn you, it is very expensive so back out now if your not willing to lay down a butt load of money. After this you want to contact companies that you can buy wholesale parts from(bearings, response ect) also you want to contact someone about anodizing. After this you’ll need packaging. Last but not least lots of money. It can cost 2-4 grand to put out a full run. (depending on size)


#6

Oh we will only do very small runs 2 see how they sell.


#7

Can’t wait to buy it and good luck


#8

For software if you have a student email you can pick up the whole AutoDesk suite for free, AutoCad, Inventor etc.


#9

Depending, you might also be able to use Blender.

As far as manufacturing goes, it’s going to cost you a TON of money. We’re looking at thousands, not hundreds. Each time you have something made, whether it’s an actual run or a prototype, it’s going to cost you.


#10

Yupp thats why smaller runs don’t work so well they cost way more per yoyo and you make very little profit to go towards bigger runs (if your looking to go in that direction)


#11

So from what I understand, you have to go balls-deep with a full run of yo-yo’s to kick start a yo-yo company?


#12

Well, if you already have your own tools, or have access to them in some way, your startup costs will be much, much lower. For instance, there’s a place called TechShop nearby that teaches, and provides access to metal lathes, welders, 3d printers, etc, and their lessons and membership fees are pretty low. If you have access to a place like this, you can run off a handful for a month or two’s membership fees and the price of materials.

Otherwise, if you want to jumpstart a company, volume can very well help. Less cost per unit and such. Engineering and prototyping time will remain the same, though, so it all depends on what you want.

Edit: The downside to larger runs, of course, is that you could bomb and be sitting on unsold product. It’s a tradeoff.


#13

no not necessarily but what I’m saying its hard to make any money with very small runs (like 25-30 throws) unless your selling wholesale.