Large and small bearings.


#1

What is the difference between small and large bearings except size? Wich one is better?
Thanks.


(JonasK) #2

André has a video where he mentions this. I think it is here:

http://yoyoexpert.com/learn/407-maintenance-ball-bearing-types.html

And like he says, the wider the bearing is, the wider the gap can be made. I think size C (also known as large) as a with og 5mm and 5mm will then be the widest possible gap with that bearing. But here is really no big deal to bearing sizes.


#3

I’m not sure how to discribe it in words… the feel is very different. I usually play large bearing as thats all the 4xl comes in, but I go a play my YYF VK or a duncan and its totally different (and yes some of that is because of the shape/size/weight distribution).

If most of my yoyos weren’t in storage I would get out my California and VK to play to be able to attempt to give a detailed description.

And small bearing gaps can be made wider if the yoyo allows for beefcaking.

Which ones is better - this all depends on what you like, it also depends on the yoyo you are using it in, how the yoyo has been designed, type of response.


#4

And despite physical play, here are some more differences:

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/5761/typecsc7.jpg

Also referred to as a size “C” bearing. These will fit the majoirty of YoYoJam yoyos, dif-e-yos and a large majority of the other high ends. Unless it states otherwise its probably a size C that the yo takes.

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/9990/typeaxv6.jpg

Also referred to as a “Duncan” or size “A” bearing.

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/3285/typedpt5.jpg

[i]Also referred to as a size “D” bearing. It’s in between a small and large bearing size wise. Although most people refer to it as HSPIN sized, it is also used in the majority of SPYY products.

Here are a few shots of each bearing next to eachother for comparison.[/i]

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/4281/bearings1sy1.jpg http://img230.imageshack.us/img230/7448/bearings2jo0.jpg

[i]There are several subtle differences between them. Here are the main properties of each:

Small Bearing

  • Slightly smaller gap. The bearing is thinner than its large counter-part, meaning the halves of the yo are closer together. Slightly more responsive.
  • “Snappy” binds. The string has to do less wraps of the bearing before it comes into contact with the response area on the yoyo meaning it will bind quickly.
  • Faster spin speeds, but will slow down quicker than the large bearing.

Large Bearing

  • Larger gap
  • Slightly delayed binds. As more of the string has to loop the bearing before the response system grabs the string there may be a slight delay before the yo returns to your hand. This is not a HUGE delay by any means, fractions of a second. But its noticeable
  • Slower spin speeds, but will usually spin for a little longer. (Note that the small and large bearings will sleep for a similar amount of time)
  • Very unresponsive

At the end of the day its a preference thing, the small bearing variations tend to be extremely popular. Personally, i prefer the large bearing. The only other difference between the two is the way the yo “kicks back” at the bottom of the string. You’ll find that the string will swing slightly differently with each. Best bet is to try one of each.[/i]

NOTE: That was not written by me. I do not take any credit whatsoever for writing that.


#5

Thanks. So small bearing will spin as long as lrage, am I right?At yoyonation they says that SB skyline has same gap size as normal Skyline, is that true? I wanna know because Yesterday I found that one guy is selling his sb skyline for 45€(about 55 bucks).


#6

Well, yeah, pretty much. I was playing with a SB Skyline, and I didnt even noticed until I looked down, and though, woah! Its SB!


(Mark) #7

Also, physics wise, the smaller it is, it has to have more revolutions to equal the same distance of a larger sphere. When you have a larger bearing, in theory, it will spin longer because it has to use less work on the yoyo to spin it. Also, if it’s larger, the friction is reduced on because the bearing doesn’t spin a many times per second but still yielding the same distance.

I hope this makes sense…


(JonasK) #8

Just like Mage said, less friction means more spin time. I believe HSpin are experimenting with stainless steel bearings with a plastic cage. They believe that they may be approaching the longest spinning non-ceramic bearing. This is getting a bit off-topic now, but I just thought that this thread was roomy enough to fit my facts.