Dremel or Drill


#1

Which is better for recessing, the high speed of a dremel or the slower speed of a drill.


#2

I have used the drill for mounting my to be modded half to. Used dremel for clean up. Drill won’t slow down when you press the tool into spinning half. But it may be a matter of opinion. Good luck either way.


#3

Half moving too fast when cutting will melt the plastic. Drill is a better choice by far. Lathe would be best though. (I know not everyone can get ont though)


#4

Wait, you can shape plastic with a lathe?

My dad has one!

And he has a weird clamp drill that holds a yo-yo horizontally.

Not sure what that is called.


#5

pics please


#6

I am not sure if I should use this.



#7

There’s a clamp on the bottom of it.


#8

There are ways you can use this. Adult supervision is a must though. I recessed my first yoyo on one. Just look up recessing a yoyo on a drill press.


#9

I actually deepened recess on my Pro-z with it.

Do you think it would work with stripping.

Also, yes, my dad knows what I’m doing and he does watch, sometimes. :smiley:

But, I am careful.


#10

If you mean removing ano or paint then yes. Just remember NEVER EVER WEAR GLOVES WHEN WORKING WITH SPINNING MACHINES!!!


#11

Yes, I won’t It might get snagged and then…

I might break my hand, or lose a finger…

And that would be terrible. The pain, the horror, no yo-yoing.


#12

A drill is far superior to a dremel for this type of thing. I honestly never recommend either, but if you’re going to do it, use a drill with a fairly low speed.

The drill has several advantages… 1) lower speed that won’t melt plastic and gives a better finish. 2) higher torque so that when you apply pressure it won’t want to stop or slow down. 3) you won’t destroy the motor by forcing it to slow down when you cut deeper than you should. 4) they tend to be larger and a lot easier to secure to something solid, like a table.

A drill press is a little better purely for the rigidity of it, but you’ll be working at a very strange angle so I don’t really know that it’s much better.

A lathe is -by far- the best option, but not everybody has access to one or is willing to spend 300-500 on a lathe setup.

Kyle


#13

Ive noticed that the dremel is more precise, but easier to screw up with.