Brexit?


#1

Totally shocking result. ???

Is the EU finished? Is Globalism dead?

What will it mean for Trump and Clinton this fall?

What effect will this have on European yo-yo championships? :’(


#2

None of the above…


#3

Not even the European yo-yo championships?

I think there is much to take away from Brexit. The reaction from the Chinese leadership is the only one that seems spot-on right now. Their economy and its place in the world seem most imperiled by a seeming retreat from “globalism”.

Will the EU be a small club of former Soviet satellite states by the end of the decade? Without the deep pockets of the British it is hard to imagine the French and the Germans making up the difference.

My experience in the investment world tells me that in the long-run, rich people do not lose money to unexpected events. Barclay’s bank has lost a third of its value this week. Without being part of the EU, Barclay’s and other British banks cannot partake of the “Fiscal Stimulus” (free money) that they have previously feasted on. I find it hard to believe they will leave these chips on the table without a fight. Will they and their financial-elite; engineer a new referendum before the articles of succession are invoked?

Heady stuff Maynard!


#4

Pretty heady stuff, but too political for the forum…


#5

That’s why it’s in the Unrelated Discussion…

Plus Stephen Colbert Is Genuinely Freaked Out About The Brexit…

And if you don’t like him then a TN bra knows…


(yoyobro!) #6

Really? Politics on YYE? Isn’t yoyoing supposed to be an escape from the world??


#7

You know what it really means? It really means its all a bunch of H.S. And I do mean a Horse load of gargantuous proportions.

The British Pound was it’s own Currency and Euro still is it’s own Currency, the whole time the agreement existed.

If you want to know what it means, THAT’S what it really means until enough countries either stop backing the Euro or some other partnership Union is formed. I could get into the Dynamics of this crap but its all Economics, man.

When you think of the word Union, definitely consider reading things like Mein Compf or something to do with the f-ing 10 planks. It’s all got to do with a Worker’s Union, that’s why their HAS TO BE a Unified Currency. But really…it’s all about the same things its always been about, how do we stiff the wage earner out of as much as we can without sticking it to theirselves. I sure hope it doesn’t go the way of Soviet Russia

More H.S. Let the Countries have their own Currencies, enuff said. If Romania is a poor Communist Slum, let thelm BE a “Poor Communist Slum”. Don’t prop them up off the backs of Germandy and el Europa. Tip tip cheerio, mate!


#8

Also, Jim Bob in the vid above is wrong…It isn’t like the United States at all. The USA is it’s own Country with a Sovereign Currency. This is a Trade Partnership, at best with 20 or more participants in the Union, I believe, I’m not sure. They’re using their Countries as Corporations to kinda become like the Trade Guilds in Star Wars: Episode 1…The Phantom Menance just they are trading on Republic Credits, etc. etc. You get the idea.


#9

Not that I care, but he never said it was the same, he said they are ‘completely’ different things. As in his statement, “cousin Lonnie, they are completely different things”. Meaning not the same, as in different or not the same.


#10

elaborate


#11

Jumping spiders, the largest family of spiders, have excellent eyesight and perform elaborate courtship and threat displays, often characterized by ritualized body postures and leg waving. —Simon Pollard, Natural History, March 1995


#12

^^^ Now that’s elaborate!

So far, the fallout has been largely in the exchange-rate of the BP. I find this to be a very curious development and shows many of us in America what is actually going on.

Throughout the Brexit campaign, all of the “traditional” pundits from academia, the media, industry, the world Bank and the politicians globally, all spoke of the pain that Brexit might bring. To hear them talk, cities would be in flames, children and pensioners would be starving and the island would be ruled by xenophobes and racists.

Because gf how international exchange-rates work, changes in the exchange-rate of the BP are domestic-price neutral. This means that the “regular” guy and their disposable income is protected from rate-exchange inflation. The rich; those that hold assets that are traded internationally and are denominated, even marginally, in other currencies took a hit. It is the Global assets that are re-valued downwards. In short; the rich suffered, the regular wage-earning man; not so much.

That speaks volumes about the vote. It speaks VOLUMES about those that campaigned so hard to stay. It bodes ill for those that stand for the status quo.

Also not buying the Old vs. young story either. The old remember an England that was not part of the EU. The young have never known anything different. The young did not vote to stay because staying was necessarily better. They voted to stay because it seemed safer. I will go with the the opinion of those that know both sides of the equation and are making a value judgement.


#13

Now with Theresa May as minister and from the stay camp, then appointing Boris Johnson foreign secretary the leader of the leave camp, it makes you wonder what’s going to happen in the fall.


#14

Great point. Is she a caretaker? Or will she frame post-Brexit policy?

Lets be clear though. All of these negotiations will hinge on Britain’s place in the European financial markets. Britain has long enjoyed a special place in finance that had only been enhanced by the participation in the EU. Their access to a vast-array of European markets; free of charge, has given them an enhanced position that was reflected in the fall of the share-price of Barclays and other Banking interests.

This position in finance is one that has endured for centuries. Their only rivals are the gnomes of Switzerland. Therefore, it is folly to believe they will not, somehow, manage to negotiate terms that are favorable; or at least palatable to these long-standing global, financial players and their interests going forward. I would put my money on the Pound once it puts in a bottom. The English are long-term winners. If this is the case, the future for Britain could be bright.