Bearing remover


#1

Which is the best bearing remover for stuck bearing?


#2

YYF multi tool is a good bearing remover. If you don’t feel like buying one though, just use pliers and be very gentle, and wiggle slowly. it will come out eventually.


#3

The yyf bearing removal tool is excellent.


#4

The YYF multi-tool is the way to go.  It’s nice and compact, removes bearings, tightens/loosens axles, cuts string, and doubles as a key chain.  Definitely worth adding to your next order but not really worth paying the shipping on if you’re ordering one by itself.

Your other options would be to go to a hardware store and find some metal rod or pipe with a .250 inch diameter that you can use just like the bearing removal bit of the multi-tool or go with JohnnyJ’s suggestion and gently use a pair of pliers.

Here’s a video showing both ways to remove the bearing:

http://www.youtube.com/v/yJP5NktkLrw?version=3&hl=en_US&rel=0

Hope that helps!

Yuki


#5

I use the circular indentation on a large kobalt needle nose pliers. I put a thin microfiber cloth over the bearing, and then grip the top 3/4 of the bearing with the indentation on the pliers. I then gently wiggle and sooner or later the bearing will pop out.


#6

I use flat nose jewelry pliers they get it out easy and don’t scratch the bearing at all plus you can find them at most craft stores


#7

Ways to remove a bearing:

  1. pliers. Hold firm, but not too firm, and rock back and forth
  2. 1/4" rod. Bearing removal tool, 1/4" drill bit, whatever you have. Insert in the bearing, rock back and forth.
  3. string method. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQ9lAP_pVxQ&feature=player_embedded

To do this more easily using any of the above methods, freeze the yoyo. Aluminum in yoyos shrinks in cold at a faster rate than steel in bearings.


#8

If you have any one drop side effects, use the half without the axle in it - gives just the right leverage. The YYF tool works good, too.


#9

I think I really have to pull it out but I can never! Is there a way to pull out? Even if the bearing can break? But don’t want the yoyo break!
Thanks


#10

Pliers… get a pair that has rounded inside… or if you have access to something like Robo-grip’s or a set that has a rubber grip on it, that way you don’t have to worry too much… as long as you don’t seriously tweak it from side to side, you shouldn’t damage the yoyo - by side to side I mean you want to be careful not to damage the groove the bearing sits in, but it would take a lot to do that (unless it’s plastic…


#11

If its a metal yoyo put it in the freezer for a little while. Then take cloth and a pair of needle nose pliers that hove the round part towards the back. Then gently wiggle the bearing back and forth until it pops out


#12

My DiBase included a bearing puller. My Rhino too also does, as well as the YYF multi-tool. I also bought line pliers just to have one last option.

The C3 Bearing puller is currently my favorite. Since it’s a rod, I have a decent grip and some leverage. The YYF tool is good too but not for super-stuck bearings. The Rhino tool’s bearing puller is OK at best, good for bearings just too tight for the finger to remove but less than what would be needed for the YYF multi-tool.


#13

As many people have said, use a pliers VERY carefully. That works for me.

Keep Your Spin, Bro


#14

i have a avant garde 2 and i never pulled out the bearing before. I even tried the freezer. And I’m afraid to break my yoyo with the grip because I broke my avant garde 1 with grip. So i need a super-stuck bearing puller. I have a YYF multitool.


#15

Freezer method coupled with an actual bearing puller and/or pliers. Patience is a must regardless. You’re just not going to get enough leverage with the YYF tool, that’ the only negative about it. For really stuck bearings, you need something larger. I only don’t recommend the 1/4" drill but because they aren’t designed for strength in any direction except along the axis of the bit.

Another option are 1/4" metal tubes you can get at the hardware store. Just cut one down to a reasonable size, anything between 2-4 inches is more than sufficient.