5A counterweight considerations

So aside from material and overall design (like, does it contain a bearing, or how is the string attached), there are three physical characteristics to consider: shape, weight, and overall size.

Now, correct me if I’m wrong, but I get the impression that weight is the number one factor in choosing a counterweight. But how important is size or shape?

I’ve never tried 5A before, so I don’t know what makes for a good counterweight shape or what might be consider ideal (or problematic) size. Is it merely about comfort in the hand? Or are there other considerations, like “grippability” or aerodynamics?

So aside from having a weight between 10g and 11g, what should one look for in an ideal 5A counterweight?

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Shape doesn’t really matter, for size as long as it’s roughly the size of a die it’s fine.

Counterweight isn’t that big of a deal. Just use a standard dice counterweight. Or if you care that much then get an ultraweight or something similar with a bearing

BUT. I think my biggest advice is…

Play 3a instead :stuck_out_tongue::joy:

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My opinion? Something soft like a Duncan bouncy ball counterweight. When learning (and maybe even after you learn) that things gonna hit the back of your hand(s). The die hurts when it hits your hand. The bouncy ball doesn’t.

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3A intimidates the bajeezus out of me, to be honest. I am kinda curious about 5A cuz of the physics of the counterweight.

I figure the Duncan rubber ball is easier on the knuckles, which is good early on, but I’m curious about later on down the road when/if hitting the knuckles and back of hand isn’t a constant occurrence. Like, do any 5A players use metal counterweights?

It occurred to me that, for instance, ALU begleri beads are the right weight (some of them, anyway), but they can sometimes be shaped oddly, and they tend to be a bit smaller than your typical counterweight die. But they often have splash finishes just as interesting as yoyo finishes (the MonkeyFingeR begleri are a good example).

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I’m not sure but I don’t think so, the counterweight can also hit the yoyo. Between my hand and the yoyo itself I wouldn’t want to use anything metal.

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Okay, good to know!

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Soft is good, in terms of weight the guy who taught me said to go for around a 1:6 ratio, so a 60 gram throw would work best with a 10 gram weight, but that is just preference. I’ve been enjoying my Porykon weight for awhile now, def recommend one of them.

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Yeah a rubber ball counterweight to start off probably isn’t a bad idea.

Honestly I’d either buy an ultraweight or if not then buy the Duncan counterweight pack(I think thy still sell those)

I remember when I was somewhere around your current level I spent a few days trying out all of the styles to see how I felt about them.

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Takeshi die if you can find em. (Yoyojam bearingized die)

For custom die, Hit up a local hobby shop that sells table top gaming supplies, you can find a ridiculous amount of different sized and weighted dies of all shapes, sizes, and sides.

Otherwise a Duncan bouncy ball is perfect.

One of my favorites Cw’s was a yoyofactory Spintop String Button, at least that’s what I was told it was from. It was a hard plastic red ball with a hole drilled through it, pretty much the same size as a Duncan bouncy ball cw.

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The Delrin Ultraweight, the POM Porykon counterweight, and the Takeshi die all make use of a bearing inside to reduce string tension buildup. Is any particular one of these better than the other two?

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There’s definitely a catch concern. Anything too small is going to be weird to work with since the standard grip is the string in your palm with the weight pressed against the outside of your hand.

Of current things on the market my favorite is the Delta Weight, then Porykon, then standard Duncan dice. I know a number of people who prefer the Rapid Ball too.

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And this just shows how long I was out of the scene! Lol
Never heard of any of those, YYJ had came out with the Takeshi die, and Jake had like 10 or so of those ulteaweights done by hand when I left haha.

I’m blown away to see all these counterweights on the market!
5a has always been a favorite!

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I’m a huge fan of the Duncan cw where you don’t need to loop the string through a hole, you just put it in your slipknot and tighten.

It’s called Candy Dice.

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So this is probably the weirdest suggestion, but Guitar/music shops that sell electric guitar guts sell different looking types of knobs that are used to change the volume and tone of the guitar, sometimes you can find dice ones, which already have a hole in it.
Image result for guitar knobs dice
This isn’t my photo but it is still a good example.

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The hole on a counterweight has to go all the way through.

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Some of the ones I found had holes all the way through.

I snagged a piece of metal off of a begleri, added some nuts for extra weight, and tied the whole thing up at the end of my Sugar Glider. Works pretty well. I’ll find some pics when I get home. I also have a chainmail CW a guy on Facebook made for me. That one is at the opposite end of my Hexada.

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I’m gonna make my counterweight out of a pocket sized throw and call it “7A yoyoing”

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Make it out of a fixie. 0A throws are A-free, so you don’t have any added A’s.

Double the Yoyo! Same great A’s!

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