Who is better?


#1

Simple.


(SR) #2

Banana


#3

out of those 2, I would have to say jensen kimmitt.


#4

By ‘better’ I’m assuming you mean who’s more likely to score higher in a contest.

MK.


#5

Me.


#6

Chuck norris! Duh!


#7

FTW

Mods, lock thread!


#8

Marcus Stein
Gentry Koh


#9

Win


#10

I am


#11

#12

Are you joking? That’s a dumb, dumb, dumb question–and I could sit there and retype “dumb,” all the ding-dong day and never finish emphasizing my point.

Gentry Stein is good… but Marcus Koh blows him out of the water. Gentry is perhaps the best American player, but the triad of Suzuki, Koh and Chia are all on their own tier which Gentry couldn’t touch if he were hopping on a trampoline while wearing stilts.


#13

I hear through the grapevine that there were judging “issues” with Gentry Stein, which unfortunately played against him, with the Asian judges not sure how to judge some of his stuff and someone else as well.

The thing that we have to consider with Suzuki, Koh and Chia is their consistency. I think Suzuki took World championship playing to a new level, and it took 3 years before someone could beat him. Even then, he’s remained way up in the final results, forcing him to find the magic method of reclaiming the title, as he did in 2012. Marcus Koh proved he wasn’t some one-off either, placing a solid 2nd in 2012, clearly defending his 2011 1A win at Worlds. I’m not as familiar with Chia in general but I’ve seen a fair number of videos and yes, he’s in the same category.

Gentry has had a major “style overhaul” this year, which seems to be working very well for him. I don’t think we should dismiss him. His style is just different and he’s been steadily improving, so with a major change and continuing to improve, he’s already a threat to the #1 spot., he just hasn’t managed to take it yet. If he can stick with this, I think the odds will be in his favor very soon, like, maybe not even 3 years.


#14

I agree with all you said, Studio42. I was just answering the question from the current vantage point. And I also believe that Chris Chia is just getting warmed up and that his progress will be stronger than Gentry Stein’s. Chia actually is a better player overall than either Suzuki or Koh in my opinion, it’s just that he lacks that vital consistency that you mentioned. If he can nail all his best tricks, his freestyle at next year’s world will blow all others out of the water, I’m willing to bet.


#15

Thank you.

I think the 2012 1A victory for Mickey was very critical to the future of his company. I don’t see him leaving the competition circle for a bit. What this did do was cement him, his brand sOMEThING, and his signature throw, the Anglam, and make his name, brand and image into one and prove he can do it on his own. From a business point of view, this was a tremendous win.

We all have to keep in mind, anyone can have a bad day, judging is subjective, imprecise and imperfect and there will almost always be controversy.

With so many great players out there, it must be difficult to be a judge. Even so, we all know the following:

There is no better/best. This is true with yoyos as it is with players.


#16

nah dude … bruce lee


#17

Found via Brett Grimes:

Bruce Lee all the way.


#18

…Did I read in this thread that Gentry Stein is the best American player?

Ugh… I mean, no disrespect to him or anything, but that is not the best player in America.

Glad somebody put these tricks together in a video, as they all blow Mickey’s, Gentry’s, Christopher’s, and Marcus’ tricks out of the water:


#19

Repost pls. Cant see YouTube video


#20

I said perhaps he is, not certainly. And I guess I wasn’t considering Yuuki Spencer, but I see no reason why Gentry’s potential can’t overtake his. And actually, to include someone not known for competition success, Guy Wright is the best American yoyoer in my book. On a side note, to suggest that the tricks in that video blow Suzuki’s, Koh’s and Chia’s tricks out of the water–you can’t be serious. Yuuki Spencer isn’t worthy of standing in Chia’s shadow on stage–ok, that’s a huge exaggeration… but you also hugely underestimate those three Asian players who are quantifiably better than their American counter-parts and are also creative forces in yoyo tricks.