Show some wooden yoyos you've made

Like drill a hole in the side of the yoyo and into the axle, then put a pin through it?

1 Like

Before anyone asks, no you can’t use the axle as a mini yoyo on its own. I tried. :joy:

5 Likes

Right, a short pin in the side of the axle the would fit into a hole in the yoyo half to prevent it from slipping.

I guess that might mess up the smoothness…

1 Like

Yeah I think it would.

Plumber’s tape rotally fixed the half slipping that was happening. Still, I will make the axle tighter to fix it in future to avoid having to use it.

1 Like

What about a notch on the axle and the body, with a pin there? Like a half-circle on the outside of the axle and a matching one on the inside of the body, then a small dowel popped into it. Could be a slight pain to align the second half in assembly, but no worse than tuning a TMBR.

2 Likes

I really like this idea, but it would be extremely difficult to pull off as both notches would need to be created independently and very accurately.

I’m about 99% sure that all it will take it a tighter fitting axle.

3 Likes

We believe in you, Glen!

2 Likes

:fist::fist::fist::fist:

They probably take too long to make to end up as a production model, still it works well.

1 Like

Understandable.

But also disappointing; I love product designs that use magnets to keep things together, yet detachable.

1 Like

Yeah, but in this case it might be more of a novelty.

Don’t get me wrong, it is super cool, and I’m sure it would perform well enough. I just can’t see it matching the performance of the regular glued together models. I could be proven wrong, of course.

All I know is I hardly play with any fixed axles other my Spinworthys, and mostly I’m just glad to get back to them when I do play with something else!

I do love the experimentation and ingenuity of it.

3 Likes

Why do you think that? The one I just made is performing very well.

2 Likes

I know it doesn’t matter as much for a fixed axle, but I thought that would be too much extra center weight. If i’m wrong, then that’s pretty awesome!

1 Like

I do actually hate adding extra weight.

1 Like

Right, my point wasn’t that it couldn’t be a good yoyo. My point was more that I love how your glued together models play so much, that I’d prefer to dig out strings, if a take apart came at a sacrifice.

I’d probably still buy one though… :grin:

1 Like

I just can’t seem to get out of my mind that I need a take apart yoyo system. It’s a recurring thinking cycle I keep going back to.

I’m also so dissatisfied with every system out there. The only plus to every system I see is that they can be taken apart. Everything else is a downside. They are all not precise enough, not reliable enough or add too much weight. Mine fails the third, but I still can’t think of a way to solve that.

There is also the problem that any system doesn’t work properly with my dimple designs like the KNack. There is not enough room at the center to fit the hardware into it, or to accommodate an axle that is long enough. sigh :disappointed:

All I really want is to give people the option to replace axles if they want to.

2 Likes

The magnet idea is super cool, regardless.

I love that you’re trying to find a better solution. Don’t give up!

1 Like

I appreciate the perfectionist in you; as an engineer I can relate. But I’ve not heard @edhaponik, for instance, express much dissatisfaction with his TMBRs or his No-Jives, so I can’t help but think that maybe the “downsides” to today’s take-apart fixies aren’t really that big a deal.

1 Like

Oh I think you’re right, the downsides aren’t a huge deal at all. I just want them perfect.

I have a TMBR yoyo, and it has flown apart on me regularly. I know with some tinkering this can be fixed, but I don’t want to make something that requires any tinkering at all.

As I’ve said before, I still think the TMBR system is very cool and pretty successful.

1 Like