Maddog painted Kendama


#1

Today I changed from painting yoyos and did a Kendama.

I call it snow and oil. It’s black with white places and Black and White speckle all over.


#2

I like it! Did you add a protective coat of any kind?


#3

Yes. Very durable…


#4

That looks soooo cool!


#5

Thanks!


#6

That looks GREAT! Very well done. I want to buy a kendama soon. :slight_smile:


#7

:smiley: thanks!


#8

does it work on plastic?


#9

Paint? Plastic wood and metal…


#10

Yeah. I just didn’t know if you had the right stuff to do it on plastic and metal… But I doubt you’re using water colors XD


#11

Go look in my paint thread or the first page in our favorite entrepreneurs thread. There is a link at the bottom of TA OP…

All my paint jobs. Mostly plastic and one metal…

http://yoyoexpert.com/forums/index.php?topic=60288


#12

I recommended that he should use clear coat in the past, I don’t think he ever used that method though.


#13

I think he said a clear coat was included in his paint thread. I could be mistaken, it wouldn’t be the first time :smiley:


#14

I do use clear coat.

Also, for this one noonar i did what you said, clear coat, paint, speckle, clear coat.

The one before this one turned out nice and glossy and really smooth. Then scratched it or gashed it before it dried…

So i re did it to this one. This one is rougher, but the first showed your idea works! Thanks


#15

I think you’re going to find painting kendamas to be a bit more satisfying than painting yoyos. What you need to do is find a company that will supply you with both raw kendamas, as well as raw kens and tamas.

I feel the tama itself makes an ideal canvas. It’s nice and clean and clear. Other than the fact it’s completely curved, it’s otherwise a “flat” area to create and design. Plus, I know for a fact that there’s a market for custom tamas, custom kens and custom kendamas. I would also suggest getting into airbrushing.

Myself, I just flat out prefer the look of raw wood. However, I might want something custom from time to time. For me, raw wood seems appropriate for the kendama. It seems to provide the right amount of friction, grip and bounce.

That aside, if you can figure out how to do sticky/tacky, you’re gonna get a lot more jobs!


#16

It actually is pretty sticky… Ill come up with something…

Im faulty with the design, not sure how to use tape to cut fancy things…