Yo-yo binding in middle of trick- Ninja Vanish


#1

I’m able to do Ninja Vanish on my Shutter, Diplomat, Skyva, and First Base.  However, when I try to do the trick with my Set Sail and Top Deck, the yo-yo binds in the middle of the trick.  Any idea why this is happening?  Thanks  :slight_smile:


#2

Maybe it’s time for it to clean your bearings. It looks like the yoyo is semi responsive. If you recently lubed the bearing that are now responsive try to throw the yoyo really hard and let the lube work in the bearing. That seems to help me. If you didn’t lube the bearing lube it and see if that helps. Otherwise all I can say to you is clean the bearing


#3

It looks like you’re popping the yo-yo up too high and it’s getting snagged where the top string meets your slack.


#4

This is what I saw as well. When the yoyo is responsive, if you don’t keep tension on the part of the string that is attached to the yoyo it’ll wind up on the first tug, and that isn’t happening hear.


#5

Lube and clean your bearing or change your response pads


#6

I was able to do Ninja Vanish with the Top Deck by switching the bearing with the Diplomat. The Diplomat also crashed into my knuckle with the Top Deck bearing in it. Do I need to use Lighter Fluid to clean the bearing of the Top Deck and then add a drop of thin lube to it?


#7

Lighter fluid is a good solvent for cleaning bearings. One Drop bearings are shielded, so remove those first (and if you’re like me… discard the shields…) and agitate the bearing in the lighter fluid. Could also soak it there for a while and then agitate again. Take the bearing out and put it on a pencil or chopstick or something to hold it secure, and flick the bearing to spin the solvent out of the races. Then let it dry for a while.

Adding a drop of thin lube is up to you. Even a full drop of One Drop V4M (or any other thin lube) will usually make the bearing semi-responsive or even fully responsive for a little while. You need to play the yoyo and be patient (ie. don’t do Ninja Vanishes!) while it breaks in. I like doing lots of Gyroscopic Flops during this break-in process.

If you don’t have that kind of patience, or just don’t feel like it, tonnes of players not only “don’t bother” with lube, but actively avoid using it, preferring a completely dry bearing. Me, I am patient enough to break in the lube and prefer the smooth sound of a lubed bearing.


#8

Could also be the flat bearing, that’s causing you trouble on this particular trick.

…bearing type.

If the flat bearing in the Top Deck and Set Sail is the culprit, it probably won’t impede you later as you get better at this trick.


#9

The yo-yos that I can do the trick on have a center trac or grooved bearing. I guess I need to work on my technique some more. My Top Deck is smooth and quiet, so I thought the bearing was in good shape. I think I’m just going to keep it the way that it is and come back to this trick when my skills improve.


#10

Flat bearings have a tendency to be a little responsive, particularly with a yo-yo that has new pads. This isn’t your skill, its the bearing combined with the pads that is making it responsive. Play the bearing more to break it in.


#11

I like to clean with acetone, but lighter fluid will work well.
I also run them dry, but that’s up to you.

Also, that flat bearing in the TD needs to get broken in along with the pads.

TD with a centering bearing is one of my main throws, and it really is boss.
It’s right up there with the QV for me. Even beating out some bi-metals.


#12

It’s this. When you hit that top string you’re doing a brush bind type move. The loop should meet the yoyo vs popping it into the string you’re holding.


#13

The technique isn’t perfect, that’s for sure. But the main thing making me “blame” the gear is that the player is succeeding on other yoyos.

OD 10-ball bearings very often go responsive when new. There’s a quick way to tell: throw a sleeper, and give it a tug into the air as if it was a responsive yoyo. Even if it doesn’t fully return, if the string starts “chasing” the bearing, the bearing is semi-responsive. Every now and then for whatever reason (alignment of the stars?) it seems fine for a throw or two but then starts chasing again. Give it a few tries.

As for the technique, with flawless technique following the tips already provided, you can definitely ninja vanish a semi-responsive yoyo. But I wouldn’t expect you to be there. I’m not even there, really. I’ve done it, but it’s a bear.


#14

Out of curiosity do you guys feel like using a centering bearing is cheating?


#15

Cheating who; exactly?

Let me ask you something. If you’re walking barefooted over a pit of hot charcoals; Would you consider walking Fast to be cheating?

I’m not really sure what even got you to consider doing something that would improve your potential to learn a trick In a non competitive environment might indicate some form of cheating?

:thinking:


#16

I mean do you think I would develop better technique if I just practiced with a flat bearing?


#17

No


#18

I agree with Yoyodoc.

Also, there is no advantage to flat bearings.
Centering bearings are categorically better in every way.
Just don’t say that out loud or people get cranky.
It’s almost as bad as bringing up the responsive thing.


(⛷) #19

Don’t we all? :wink:

I think this might be a bit strong. It somewhat depends on your play style, preferences as well as the yoyo and the type of tricks you enjoy. In the end I personally don’t worry much about what bearing is in a yoyo. I generally play what it arrives with stock.

As far as cranky, nobody ever gets cranky here. ::slight_smile:


#20

I would like to agree with you about play style, but every time I bring it up and try to have a reasonable discussion, some Flat-Bearinger gets upset, or just says, “Because I like it.”

Also, I think is really interesting that we talk a lot about how fun it is, and how yoyoing shouldn’t be competitive, but sometimes there is an undercurrent of, “if you can’t do it old school, you arn’t cool.”

ie - Learning responsive, flat bearings, and organic shapes.