Science project, bearing suggestions


(M²) #1

Ok, so i do science project every year or so, (my last one turned out great, i got to state and won $300) and i know i wanted to do something about yoyos. Then i though about the bearings, and how a lot of people say the ceramics don’t spin longer than steel and stuff, and though for the most part i beleive them, i thought it would be somehting fun to test. So the bearing i’m planning on testing so far are
Normal (YYJ)
General yo (because i have one laying around)
Ceramic
10 ball
desheilded
thin lubed
thick lubed
mercury
EZO gold bearing
(i might do konkaves if i test how long they make a yoyo spin)
Anyways, i was wondering if you guys know of any other bearings i could test. Price is more or less irrelavant, but i can’t go to high.
Edit: looks like i have a pretty good selection here so i probably won’t be testing kk’s.


#2

10 ball?


#3

HSpin/SPYY size D


#4

You might try a lightly lubed bearing versus a dry one.


#5

yoyoguy used to have all kinds of bearings that they promoted. They may have some interesting choices still available.


#6

Perhaps a center-track bearing? Maybe also thick lube vs thin lube vs dry? I’d be interested to see the results…good luck! Will you be doing a ceramic KK bearing? I also saw a new bearing similar to a center track, but the groove is a “v”, almost like a cross between KK and center track, wish I could remember where I saw it. If you end up with too big a bearing collection after, maybe I could buy a few spares off you (depending on the results of course) ;D


#7

mercury bearing. ;D


(M²) #8

couple quesitons
Does anyone know were i can get a non kk ceramic bearing?
Does anyone know were i can get a 10 ball?


#9

for a 10 ball go to onedropyoyos


#10

[quote= Engineers Edge, LLC ]Ceramic bearings are typically constructed with a ferrous inner and outer ring or race with ceramic balls in the place of steel. Ceramic bearings offer many advantages over all steel bearings, such as higher speed and acceleration capability, increased stiffness, lower friction and more. Ceramic balls are also non-conductive. Ceramic bearings are available in all standard industry configurations such as, angular bearings, thrust bearing, pillow block bearing, needle bearings, and roller bearings.

Ceramic bearings balls are typically made from (Si3N4) ceramic silicon nitride and have greater hardness than steel balls resulting in longer ball life. Ceramic bearing balls have smoother surface finishes than most steel bearing balls. Thermal properties are also better steel balls which result in less heat generation due to friction at high speeds. To manufacture a extra fine surface finish on ceramic balls, the balls are elevated with a magnetic field and then polished with plasma stream. Ceramic bearings balls are rated at higher spin rates than steel bearing balls.

Ceramic bearing balls require less lubricant and exhibt less lubrication degradation, which results in increased bearing life. Ceramic bearings manufactured from Si3N4 can operate at temperatures up to 1600F. Ceramics also are resistant to oxidation.

Typical applications for ceramic bearings:

High temperature applications, friction, high speed, aircraft accessory, semiconductor and food processing, dental hand-piece turbines. Many high speed electric motors requiring voltage isolation use ceramic material bearings.
[/quote]
Now, it has been tested over and over and what most will agree on in other circles is that a better made bearing made of steel will perform better than a lesser quality ceramic. A Ceramic bearing under load may or may not out spin a metal bearing. It will also most likely have a shorter lifespan than the metal bearing in the situations that yoyos are used in. So, it all depends on where you get your bearings from. Are they Swiss, Japanese, Chinese, etc. The Quality differences can be much bigger than you might assume. So, first you need to test comparables. Anyway have fun on your project…Oh, if you want to learn a bit of practical info (or arguments) head over to a longboard forum or a inline skate forum. You may find something of use.


#11

Small to large bearing, just regular EZO bearings ( They are only size D)
SPEC, YYJ SPEED Bearing, BC groovers, etc.


(M²) #12

Now, it has been tested over and over and what most will agree on in other circles is that a better made bearing made of steel will perform better than a lesser quality ceramic. A Ceramic bearing under load may or may not out spin a metal bearing. It will also most likely have a shorter lifespan than the metal bearing in the situations that yoyos are used in. So, it all depends on where you get your bearings from. Are they Swiss, Japanese, Chinese, etc. The Quality differences can be much bigger than you might assume. So, first you need to test comparables. Anyway have fun on your project…Oh, if you want to learn a bit of practical info (or arguments) head over to a longboard forum or a inline skate forum. You may find something of use.
[/quote]
most of the science expeiramants people do have already been done, but thats not really the point.


#13

Nope the point is you want to perform a project of your own. I just threw a bit of info your way.


#14

You can try terrapin X bearings :slight_smile:


(M²) #15

are those the ones that are really really konkaved?


#16

Not Really lol

PM’d a Link


#17

That’s the new HSpin bearing.


(Thomas) #18

center track.


#19

I’d try and minimize your variables and leave out the lube altogether, unless you performed how each bearing performed dry and with equal amounts of thin lube and finally each with equal amounts with thick lube.

I would personally just perform the experiment using one all stainless steel bearing, one bearing with only ceramic balls such as a ceramic KonKave, and finally one completely ceramic bearing like the ones you can find on ebay, all completely dry. That way you can keep your extraneous variables to a minimum and test exactly what you set out to test - ceramic vs. steel.


(BB) #20

try a ceramic hybrid