Fixed axle goodness


#1

There is much love for the new trend of “Wood is Good.” So I have a question. Wood yoyos are generally accepted to sport a “fixed axle” that is made of wood. Duncan butterflys also appear to have their axle fixed.( a metal one?)

What kind of difference in performance can you expect from the differing axle material and do you use cotton strings for metal axles as well?


#2

I’m pretty sure people like wood because of the material. No only does material make a huge difference in a yoyo, but they like to enjoy the roots of yoyoing.


#3

Haha, get it?? Trees have roots…

I am also interested in this as well. I suppose using wood would allow for more of a grip when you’d give it a tug compared to a much smoother surface such as metal or plastic.


(Waylon) #4

A metal axle requires a response system, such as the starburst in a Duncan Butterfly. Wood axle throws generally don’t require a response system because the friction of the string on the axle is enough to return it to your hand. You can use any string you like on a metal axle. The friction is low, therefore you won’t melt polyester like you would on wood.


(ed) #5

i experience a LOT more inconsistency and fragility from butterflies than from most of the good wood models. drew tetz loves a good butterfly (and so do i) but they are few and far between. for me, there’s an undeniable holistic appeal to throwing something that’s carved out of a hunk of organic matter. i find that plastic fixed axle yoyo’s tend to feel like plastic bearing yo-yo’s… which just don’t sleep very long, whereas wood has an indescribable feel that just inspires me to play.


#6

Agreed.

I’m keen to develop more of my sense of the different types of wood axles (hemlock, walnut, etc)


(Waylon) #7

You make a good point. Butterflies are cheap and inconsistent. You’d have to buy several to find one that plays decent. And there really is no substitute for wood.